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Texas bakery sells out of goods after backlash for its Pride rainbow cookies

Texas bakery sells out of goods after backlash for its Pride rainbow cookies

June 7, 2021
Click here to view original web page at www.theguardian.com

A small Texas bakery which lost orders and Facebook followers after posting a message in support of the LGBTQ community sold out its inventory two days in a row over the weekend, after a surge of support from around the world. Confections, in Lufkin, east Texas, said it had […]

Click here to view original web page at www.theguardian.com


A small Texas bakery which lost orders and Facebook followers after posting a message in support of the LGBTQ community sold out its inventory two days in a row over the weekend, after a surge of support from around the world.

Confections, in Lufkin, east Texas, said it had suffered a backlash after posting a photo on 2 June of a rainbow-decorated cookie in the shape of a heart, accompanied by the message: “More LOVE. Less hate. Happy Pride to all our LGBTQ friends! All lovers of cookies and happiness are welcome here.”

The message, marking Pride month which runs through June, was followed up by a more solemn post the next day.

“Today has been hard. Really hard,” Confections wrote. “We lost a significant amount of followers because of a rainbow heart cookie we posted.

“We received a very hateful message on our business page canceling a large order (5dz) of summer themed cookies for tomorrow morning (that we just finished decorating) because of a rainbow heart cookie we posted.”

“My heart is heavy. Honestly I never thought a post that literally said more love less hate would result in this kind of backlash to a very small business that is struggling to stay afloat and spread a little cheer through baked goods.”

The bakery added that it now had “an over abundance” of cookies available for sale, but could hardly have expected what happened next. The post attracted more than 11,000 likes, from people around the world, with people more local to east Texas promising to visit the bakery.

Many duly did attend, and a photo posted by Confections showed a line of customers stretching down the street outside the business. On Saturday, Confections returned to Facebook to share some good news.

“We’ve sold out,” the bakery wrote, adding that the team were “just so humbled and grateful and moved by this outpouring of love”.

Confections said after it sold out of its baked goods, some customers had lingered and donated money, which it said would go towards local animal rescues.

As the company scrambled to respond to the thousands of goodwill messages sent across Facebook and Instagram, co-owner Miranda Dolder wrote a comment to those who had shown support.

“Thank you!” Dolder wrote.

“More love, less hate. Always.”

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