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Join The Texas Tribune for a conversation about how voting and elections will change in Texas

Join The Texas Tribune for a conversation about how voting and elections will change in Texas

May 17, 2021
Click here to view original web page at www.texastribune.org

How Voting and Elections Will Change in Texas Sign up for The Brief , our daily newsletter that keeps readers up to speed on the most essential Texas news. Throughout the 2021 Texas legislative session, Republicans have cleared the way to limit how and when voters can cast ballots […]

Click here to view original web page at www.texastribune.org


How Voting and Elections Will Change in Texas

Sign up for The Brief, our daily newsletter that keeps readers up to speed on the most essential Texas news.

Throughout the 2021 Texas legislative session, Republicans have cleared the way to limit how and when voters can cast ballots — pushing legislation that tightens the state’s voting rules and raises barriers for groups Texas’ voting rules have long marginalized. What do these changes mean for voting and elections in Texas?

Join The Texas Tribune at noon Central time May 24 for a conversation with Heider Garcia, Tarrant County’s elections administrator, and Isabel Longoria, Harris County’s elections administrator. Tribune Demographics Reporter Alexa Ura will moderate.

They’ll discuss the future of voting in Texas and what changes can be made during the final weeks of the 2021 legislative session to improve elections. The conversation will also be available to view on demand shortly after it streams.

Register for the conversation here

Garcia has served as elections administrator for Tarrant County since 2018. Previously, he was elections manager for Placer County in California.

Longoria was sworn in as Harris County’s first elections administrator in November. Previously, she served as senior adviser for voting rights and access in the Harris County clerk’s office.

This conversation will be livestreamed starting at noon Central on Monday, May 24, here and on our social media channels.

Tribune events are supported through contributions from our founding investors and members. Though donors and corporate sponsors underwrite Texas Tribune events, they play no role in determining the content, panelists or line of questioning.

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Perhaps it goes without saying — but producing quality journalism isn't cheap. At a time when newsroom resources and revenue across the country are declining, The Texas Tribune remains committed to sustaining our mission: creating a more engaged and informed Texas with every story we cover, every event we convene and every newsletter we send. As a nonprofit newsroom, we rely on members to help keep our stories free and our events open to the public. Do you value our journalism? Show us with your support.

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